Good Morning, GIMENEZ! There IS a rule against family members lobby elected relatives, it's called RICO, we even googled it for you!

Miami New Times:

Beckham's New Plan Highlights Miami's Big Problem With Lobbyists Related to Politicians

Good Morning, GIMENEZ! There IS a rule against family members lobby elected relatives, it's called RICO, we even googled it for you!

Miami-Dade’s Ethics Commission: 

There IS a rule against this. Family members are NOT free to lobby on projects facing votes from elected relatives. 

It's called RICO:

    • RICO: "Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act"

    • § 1962. Prohibited activities:
      • (A) - "It shall be unlawful for any person who has received any income derived, directly or indirectly, from a pattern of racketeering activity or through collection of an unlawful debt in which such person has participated as a principal"
    • Gimenez has influence over the outcome and Gimenez SON is getting income for the action... It's borderline... 
    Miami's political ecosystem has long had a problem with family members getting paid to lobby other, elected family members. Last night's hours-long sideshow at the Miami City Commission over David Beckham's latest soccer plan was just another testament to how it's basically taken for granted that developers are going to pay patronage fees to the lawmakers' relatives on huge projects.  

    Before the meeting, Beckham's MLS group hired Barbara Hardemon, Commissioner Keon Hardemon's aunt, as a lobbyist on the project. Commissioners deferred a vote until next week, when Hardemon may well be the deciding vote on the $1 billion proposal to build a private soccer stadium on publicly owned land. At the same time, his aunt is getting paid to convince the commissioner and his colleagues to vote for the deal. Keon Hardemon is not recusing himself from the July 18 vote.

    This happens all the time in Miami City Hall. Lobbying records show Barbara Hardemon is also working for the Ultra Music Festival and the Munilla Construction Management building firm, among other groups — familial connections like this are either ignored or buried in paragraph 33 of many news stories about city deals. 

    There's a reason Beckham has partnered with Jorge Mas, the progeny of one of the rich Miami families that pioneered the city's clubby and incestuous style of politics. For the last few months, outsiders have praised Beckham for partnering with Mas, since, the prevailing wisdom goes, Mas is a seasoned operator who knows how to succeed at city hall. In Miami, that basically just translates into Mas knowing how to play the area's small handful of dynastic political families against one another.

    But the problem goes deeper than the Hardemon family. The Beckham/Mas team has also hired C.J. Gimenez, the son of Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez, as a lobbyist. C.J. is an up-and-coming star in Florida's world of political influencers — he briefly joined ex-Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski's lobbying firm for a few months in the spring of 2017 but left that May because the firm, Avenue Strategies, took on Citgo, the Venezuelan national oil company, as a client.

    While C.J. is not currently listed as an active lobbyist at the county level, he repeatedly lobbied commissioners from 2004 to 2011 while his father, Carlos, was sitting on the dais. The younger Gimenez remains close to city commissioner and domestic-abuse-accused Trump apologist Joe Carollo, and the Beckham group's hiring was largely seen as an attempt to get Carollo to vote for the plan. 

    But it's not hard to imagine that a development team constructing a $1 billion stadium package will need to ask the county for a few favors over the years, and it's going to be difficult for the elder Gimenez to forget which team his son works for. Case in point: The county mayor has already appeared alongside Beckham at numerous MLS events in Dade County, including Beckham's confetti-filled January team announcement.

      ALSO: (other evidence of RICO)

      • More info soon!

      Thanks to the Miami Herald and authors like DOUG HANKS

      A special thanks to those who contacted and emailed us and contributed.


      RICO
       CASE:

      (a) It shall be unlawful for any person who has received any income derived, directly or indirectly, from a pattern of racketeering activity or through collection of an unlawful debt in which such person has participated as a principal within the meaning of section 2, title 18, United States Code, to use or invest, directly or indirectly, any part of such income, or the proceeds of such income, in acquisition of any interest in, or the establishment or operation of, any enterprise which is engaged in, or the activities of which affect, interstate or foreign commerce. A purchase of securities on the open market for purposes of investment, and without the intention of controlling or participating in the control of the issuer, or of assisting another to do so, shall not be unlawful under this subsection if the securities of the issuer held by the purchaser, the members of his immediate family, and his or their accomplices in any pattern or racketeering activity or the collection of an unlawful debt after such purchase do not amount in the aggregate to one percent of the outstanding securities of any one class, and do not confer, either in law or in fact, the power to elect one or more directors of the issuer.

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