IRMA debris is still in Miami, Gimenez is in Europe... Gimenez hightailing responsibilities?

Miami Herald:


Why are miles of Irma debris still sitting on some secluded Miami-Dade streets?



A pile of debris in the Greenway Lakes neighborhood in Southwest Miami-Dade. Pickup has been delayed because Miami-Dade County is requiring associations on private roads to sign a waiver allowing them to pick up the debris. -Maria Luisa Castellanos

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Two months after Hurricane Irma ripped through South Florida, while debris cleanup efforts have been slow but steady in most parts of Miami-Dade, thousands of homeowners are still dealing with trash that most people can’t see.

The reason? Those homeowners live on private roads and in communities that learned weeks after the storm that they have to give special permission to the county to come clear their streets, based on federal guidelines.
County officials have made a push since late September asking homeowners associations and property managers — representing about 75,000 homeowners on 1,600 miles of private streets — to sign a waiver allowing county crews and contractors to come onto private roads and clear out the debris. The deadline for submitting the waivers is Nov. 17.
The county has been clearing debris on those private roads as the waivers come in, said Gayle Love, spokeswoman for the county’s Department of Solid Waste Management, but there are still many private streets in West and Southwest Miami-Dade with heaps of debris out of the public’s view.
Love said that county officials tried to make the case to FEMA that the department normally handles trash collection in those areas but the agency wouldn’t budge on requiring the waivers. The federal agency is stepping in between the county and its regular customers because it will reimburse the county for the cost of cleanup work that the storm created.

“For some of the residents this may be taking a little longer, but there are guidelines and we have to follow those guidelines,” Love said.
The county didn’t know the “right to entry” waivers were required until shortly after the storm hit, Love said, adding that officials got the paperwork out to the associations in late September and early October. In the past few weeks they have stepped up efforts to reach those associations that haven’t responded.
Some associations hired their own contractors to take care of the debris, Love said, pointing to pockets of Doral and Miami Lakes.
“If they chose to push everything out on the public right of way, that was an option as well,” Love said.
But there has been some opposition.
...

A pile of trash in the Greenway Lakes neighborhood in Southwest Miami-Dade. Pickup has been delayed because Miami-Dade County is requiring associations on private roads to sign a waiver allowing them to pick up the trash. -Maria Luisa Castellanos


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